Repairs made at Rexroat Prairie help keep the cabins’ stories alive

  • Artist at work — With a pallet of cement and mortar, Ruppert Parrish artfully fills in the gaps between the logs of a cabin wall at The Rexroat Prairie in Virginia. The material between the logs is called chinking, and works to keep wind and moisture out of the cabin and helps prevent decay. At right is the “Dog Trot” cabin, so named because the center space allowed dogs to trot in and out. (Photo by Brian DeLoche.)
    Artist at work — With a pallet of cement and mortar, Ruppert Parrish artfully fills in the gaps between the logs of a cabin wall at The Rexroat Prairie in Virginia. The material between the logs is called chinking, and works to keep wind and moisture out of the cabin and helps prevent decay. At right is the “Dog Trot” cabin, so named because the center space allowed dogs to trot in and out. (Photo by Brian DeLoche.)
  • Rexroat Prairie. (Photo by Brian DeLoche)
    Rexroat Prairie. (Photo by Brian DeLoche)
  • Inside looking out — A view from inside a cabin at The Rexroat Prairie reveals the scope, the size and the number of spaces where chinking needs to be applied. (Photo by Brian DeLoche.)
    Inside looking out — A view from inside a cabin at The Rexroat Prairie reveals the scope, the size and the number of spaces where chinking needs to be applied. (Photo by Brian DeLoche.)
Without saying a word, the cabins at The Rexroat Prairie in Virginia have stories to tell. Stories of the people who once lived within their walls, stories of when and where they were originally built. The cabins, however, can only tell their tales with the help of people who keep their stories alive – people who repair their roofs, people who whitewash the walls and fill in the cracks to prevent…

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